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Archive for May, 2015

This is the second post in a series reporting on the evening event I attended on information literacy in the work place. The second speaker was Nancy Graham from the London School of Economics, who’s presentation was titled “It’s the (knowledge) economy, stupid”, which I thought was great. Nancy focused on how higher education (HE) libraries help to equip future graduates with high level skills for their future jobs.

Nancy introduced the topic by referring to the Leitch Report (2006) and the Wilson Review (2012), which both examine the move from a traditionally industrialist and manual work force to an increase in university students and an increasing high level workforce and ‘knowledge economy’. There is a pressure on universities to attract students by persuading them how the university will prepare them for work in such a way that they will be able to obtain good work easily. Libraries play an important part of this; obviously playing a central role in helping them research for their current studies, but also in how they can help students to become information literate for after they graduate for their future job roles. Nancy spoke of the balance between helping them to enjoy their studies and learning in the moment, and the need to prepare them for the world of work without turning them in to mini-librarians themselves. I am sympathetic to this, remembering how the last year of my degree I was very focused on finding a job and how I could improve my employability, and it did take away the enjoyment of purely studying philosophy and English for the joy of it. It is a fine balance to strike.Nancy Graham presenting

Nancy commented that improving the employability of students is a university wide collaboration, and as such the different university departments such as the careers department and the library should all work together to accomplish this. This is particularly successful when the information literacy becomes embedded in the course, with maybe 3 information literacy sessions a year being taught by librarians. However this requires the support of the teaching faculty, and some are more supportive than others! I found this a very interesting parallel, as this is very similar to the challenges we face in a law firm; trying to get the support of the leading partners of a department (e.g. Banking) so that we can attend their team meetings and offer refresher training and promote library services to encourage lawyers to make full use of our resources and to ensure they are conducting legal research in an efficient way. Their time is very valuable (lawyers tend to charge clients hourly), and so we have to demonstrate the return on investment for them if they give us half hour of their time to providethem with training, how much time (and consequently money) they will save in the future by searching more efficiently. And similarly to Nancy, and I am sure in all library settings, there will be some stakeholders that are more supportive than others, and it is a constant challenge to get everyone on board.

And this links back nicely to Stephane’s concluding point (see post 1) – we need to speak to stakeholders in a language they understand, in terms of a return on investment. For universities, it is how the library and information literacy education will improve the employability of students, which will as a result attract new potential students to attend their university. For lawyers, we need to speak in terms of time and money, and with regards to the choice of information sources, the quality of work that we provide to our clients.

Post 3 on Ian Hunter’s presentation to follow soon!

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One of my work objectives for this year is to review our induction process to see if we can improve it in any way, and so I was thrilled to see SLA Europe and the Information Literacy group (ILG) co-host an event called  Information Literacy in the Workplace.

The structure of the event was 3 speakers each with a different focus, followed by a Q&A session with the panel and then networking with nibbles – hosted at the University of Liverpool on Finsbury Square in London. Since there were three separate presentations, I think it would be most useful to do 3 different posts in order to do each of the speakers and their presentations justice. So stay tuned for more posts to follow!

Information Literacy in the WorkplaceThe first speaker was Stephane Goldstein from InformAll, who spoke about the value of information literacy to employers. InformAll is an initiative to promote the value of information and research data literacy from within and beyond the higher education (HE) sector, and to try and work with the both the HE sector and employers. Stephane commented that information literacy is relevant to employment settings, even if employers do not recognise it explicitly, or recognise it but by another name (such as digital literacy). In the workplace, information literacy is important for information and knowledge management, the ability to make sound judgements regarding information and data sharing, as well as contributing to skills that employers value highly such as problem solving, critical thinking and research skills.

Stephane spoke on people being key information resources themselves, and being able to tap in to their expertise and accumulated knowledge of the organisation they work for is important for their colleagues. Stephane used the example of people working in the nuclear industry, but this is every much prevalent in the legal sector where knowledge management is incredibly important in saving the lawyers time, and consequently money. For example, if a lawyer needs a particular type of agreement, he or she will most likely search their firm’s knowledge management system for a precedent or an example of the agreement that has already been used by the firm before, rather than write one from scratch. But re-using and making the most of the knowledge of colleagues is important for employers and organisations from all sectors, but the existence of a formal knowledge management system to capture this information and make it discoverable is not necessary as widespread as it should be.

Finally, Stephane spoke of the importance of talking to employers in a language they understand – if they are more aware of the concept of digital literacy, rather than information literacy, then use that terminology instead. Explain how information literacy relates to factors important to them; such as by providing operational efficiency, providing them with competent and confident staff, and aiding their success in the marketplace by having accurate and timely information. I feel that this advice to demonstrate a return on investment and speak in their language in terms they understand and deem valuable is very important; whether you are trying to persuade a stakeholder of the value of information literacy or whether you are trying to obtain their support for something else. It was an interesting talk that certainly set up the next 2 speakers’ sessions very well, one of which spoke about information literacy of students before they enter the workplace, and one who spoke about information literacy within the corporate workplace, and specifically within a law firm.

Posts on these talks to follow soon!

Info Literacy in the Workplace

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