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Archive for June, 2015

Brighton Pier

Last week, I was lucky enough to attend the annual BIALL conference as SLA Legal Division’s representative. Many professional associations invite delegates from other associations (and particularly international ones) to their conferences, and this certainly fitted in with the theme of this year’s conference – Collaboration, Cooperation and Connectivity.

Me on brighton beachAnd rather unexpectedly this theme came to life for me in the social interaction and niceties of the conference. Now, having a few conferences under my belt, contacts and friends in the profession, and some years’ professional experience, I absolutely loved and thrived on the social networking opportunities that the BIALL conference offered. I began the conference by attending the infamous Justis party held on Brighton Pier with the first (of many) offerings of fish and chips, which was so much fun and a great way to meet other people as it was a smaller, more intimate setting than the big formal events of the conference.

PrenaxThere was also the exhibition hall with vendors, who had many games and prizes to be won as well as copious amounts of cake and sweets to be eaten (the vendors had well and truly done their research on librarians!). BIALL also came up with a Magna Carta quiz to celebrate the 800th anniversary, which required you to visit each vendor in order to get an answer to the quiz. This was a great ice breaker to approach vendors with, and I really enjoyed speaking to them and learning of the new and upcoming products out there. It’s also good to put faces to names, when we have worked with vendors either by email or telephone but have never met in person – I feel it makes a huge difference to your working relationship.

Brighton MuseumAnd of course, when we talk of social networking we cannot leave the formal evening events out! The first night was held at the Brighton  Museum and Art Gallery, which was full of the weird and wonderful, and in some cases quite frankly disturbing. The exhibitions served as great talking points, as were the fish and chips served up in small individual bowls, which logistically proved difficult to eat while holding a gin cocktail at the same time (first world/librarian problems!).

The final evening was the formal President’s reception and annual dinner held at the Hilton itself (it was lovely only having to totter down the stairs in high heels and not to walk to a different venue), and this was the highlight of the conference for me.

Myself and Helen

Dancing the night away – Helen and I

Being the SLA rep meant that I had a place at the head table with BIALL committee members and some of the other international delegates. Some of the members I already knew and some I didn’t, so it was really lovely to get to know the individuals I had heard of but had never met in person, and to catch up with old friends. It was also particularly special to see my friend and fellow SLA member Anneli Sarkanen receive the Wildy Law Librarian of the Year Award, which was thoroughly deserved and was given to a very stunned and modest Anneli! The awards were followed by dancing the night away, and I was reminded of the SLA IT dance parties I have attended previously and the great community feel that it evokes. It’s just so nice that everyone celebrates the end of the conference by getting up, having a dance and singing loudly to well known classics. An evening which confirms in my mind that I am certainly in the right profession!

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The third and final speaker for this event was Ian Hunter, from Shearman and Sterling, who spoke on information literacy in the work place, and in particular in a law firm. Obviously this session was of the most relevance to my work, but I also thought it provided a nice flow to the evening following Nancy’s talk on HE and considering how the information literacy needs of law graduates change from HE to becoming a trainee solicitor at a firm.

Ian Hunter presentingWhen a trainee joins a law firm they tend to undergo an extensive training programme, of which the library is usually a part. Ian reported that at his firm they still demonstrate Westlaw and Lexis Library (the 2 main legal databases used for UK case law and legislation) and a treasure hunt through the physical resources (which is very similar to what we do at my firm), but Ian is now also providing training on how to use Google and other business sources, with less emphasis on Westlaw and Lexis.

The marketing or business development teams, as well as junior lawyers, are increasingly asking the library for economic information, and Google is an important resource to conduct this search with. Ian has been offering training on Google and demonstrating the advanced search, which has been very well received. This also touches on something Nancy Graham mentioned in her presentation – if you know your users are more likely to be using Google (particularly the ‘Google generation’) rather than the authoritative subscriptions you promote to them, then you might as well work with their current way of searching and teach them how to best use Google and teach them to critically analyse the sources they find on Google. In the legal sector, there is a tendency for lawyers to simply Google for a piece of UK legislation, which they are most likely to find on legislation.gov.uk – but most of them will fail to realise that the legislation on this website is not kept up to date and cannot be relied on. That is why law firms subscribe to databases such as Westlaw and Lexis Library, which are updated daily and provide added value with analysis and links between related cases and legislation. However, if we provide training on how to use Google for business development information, then we can use the opportunity to highlight that for legal information they should be using primary sources that we subscribe to, and not Google.

PanelOne thing Ian reported as an issue for more senior lawyers is the information overload problem. Ian raised an interesting point that clients take it as a given that they are going to receive high quality legal advice; what they are really looking for are lawyers with an understanding of their business and the industry that they operate in, and so the research the library is increasingly being asked to undertake is business development rather than legal information. Furthermore, information retrieval is playing less of a role and the pushing out of business and industry information via alerts and updates is becoming more important. However, as a result, the number of alerts and emails can be overwhelming and information overload is a problem. There a number of third party services that offer solutions to this, combining numerous alerts in to one daily email.

Ian also touched upon knowledge management and how important it is in the legal sector. There are issues where younger layers expect the internal knowledge management system to behave like Google, and Ian wondered whether making lawyers use filters and tags to search for information rather than creating their own free text search is a good thing for information literacy – as a searching strategy it doesn’t help if they are looking for something obscure. Ian referred to an article published in the Law Society Gazette entitled “Net Surfing Lawyers Warned of Compliance Risk”, and how as a result BIALL published their Legal Information Literacy Statement which was picked up by the Solicitors Regulatory Authority (SRA), who then launched an education and training review. Professional bodies may have a role to play in information literacy and providing reward or accreditation for attending information literacy sessions. Ian concluded by summarising that there is a lack of information literacy in the corporate world, and that teaching needs to focus more on the choice of sources rather than the mechanism of searches.

Overall it was a very enjoyable and engaging evening – there were lots of questions for the panel, and lots of drinks and nibbles for the networking afterwards. Myself and my colleague were already excitedly discussing offering Google training as we left the lcture theatre, hoping to offer it in team meetings and possibly introduce it to our trainee training too. If you have any thoughts or ideas about information literacy, whether in the legal sector or elsewhere I would love to hear them!

Nibbles and networking

Nibbles and networking

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